Chronic Wounds: Healing the Problem

Part 2: The patient’s perspective Chronic, non-healing wounds have been called a “silent epidemic.” As we explored in our previous blog, problem wounds are often found in post-acute care (PAC) patients. Many PAC patients have chronic conditions such as diabetes and vascular disease that weaken their immune systems and complicate wound healing. If these wounds aren’t properly treated, they can lead …

Chronic Wounds: Healing the Problem

Part 1: The physician’s perspective About 6.5 million Americans suffer from chronic, non-healing wounds—at an annual cost of $25 billion. Problem wounds are particularly prevalent among patients in post-acute care (PAC) facilities, many of whom have chronic conditions that compromise their immune systems and make healing difficult. “The most common wounds encountered in post-acute care are pressure sores, vascular ulcers, …

Sepsis: Fighting a Deadly Intruder

It’s a shocking statistic. Worldwide, every 3.5 seconds, someone dies from sepsis. This fast-moving medical complication sets in when the body tries to fend off an infection but attacks instead its own tissues and organs. Today, sepsis is the leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals and the tenth-leading cause of death throughout the country. Determining the risk “Patients at …

Transitional Care: Delivering Better Outcomes for Medically Complex Patients

It’s been called the “boomerang effect”—patients discharged from the hospital who bounce right back for readmission. Almost 20 percent of discharged Medicare patients are readmitted within 30 days at an annual cost of $15 billion to $20 billion. Often the cause of readmission is patients being discharged before they’re ready or transitioning to an environment, such as the home, where …

Healthcare’s Next Horizon: Mining the Value of Post-Acute Care Partners

It’s a brave new world in healthcare – rife with promise but also replete with demands. Through such initiatives as the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), the federal government continues to signal its future direction with the industry: paying for value, not volume, of care. Increasingly, providers will be asked to navigate exacting incentive programs that …